Medicaid

 

Medicaid for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled.

For years, the Attorneys at Yoder & Kraus have assisted families in Northeast Indiana, including Fort Wayne, Indiana, with Medicaid planning. 

Did You Know?

  • Did you know that if a single or widowed Medicaid applicant has surviving children, then the single or widowed Medicaid applicant can usually preserve a portion, and in some cases all, of his or her assets and still qualify for Medicaid?
  • Did you know that if the Medicaid applicant has a spouse at home, generally all of the joint assets can be preserved and the spouse who resides in the nursing home can still qualify for Medicaid?

Five Common Medicaid Myths:

Myth 1: If I am single or widowed, I have to liquidate all of my assets to pay for my medical bills and to privately pay for my nursing home care.

Fact: There is no requirement that you have to liquidate your assets and use those funds for medical bills or to privately pay for nursing home care, although many nursing homes will tell you otherwise.

Myth 2: If I am married and have a spouse at home, my spouse and I must spend down one-half of the total value of all of our assets on my medical bills and to privately pay for my nursing home care.

Fact: Again, there is no requirement that you have to liquidate your assets and use those funds for medical bills or to privately pay for nursing home care, although many nursing homes will tell you otherwise. 

Myth 3: I can give away $13,000.00 per year, per child, and still qualify for Medicaid.

Fact: This is a federal estate and gift tax rule that has nothing to do with Medicaid.  You should not make any gifts for Medicaid planning purposes without seeking the advice of an Elder Law Attorney.

Myth 4: I cannot give anything away if I want to qualify for Medicaid.

Fact: The Medicaid rules provide that a person may be penalized for transferring assets in some cases. However, this depends on how much was given away, when, to whom, and the date the Medicaid application is filed.  Again, you should not make any gifts for Medicaid planning purposes without seeking the advice of an Elder Law Attorney.

Myth 5: I cannot keep any of my assets and qualify for Medicaid.

Fact: In many cases, a Medicaid applicant or the spouse at home may keep a house, a car, and personal property, among other things, and still qualify for Medicaid. 

 

If you or a loved one needs long-term nursing home care and you want to qualify yourself or a loved one for Medicaid, then contact Yoder & Kraus today.